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Sunday, September 4, 2016

Increasing stamina of JP is mind-blowing

Something strange is happening in the Telugu-speaking region of India. A person who has lost the election badly, who is perceived to be a "failed politician", who has renounced electoral politics, who has persuaded his party to renounce electoral politics, who is ignored by the national and the local media, who continues to not indulge in any gimmicks to get attention, who is currently not leading a ground-level people's movement, who is ignored by all the power-players, who is slowly getting old in an young society, is increasingly being adored, respected by the people.
JP is gaining strength. Importantly, though JP is not doing much to get that strength, still, he is gaining strength.
Just watch his Facebook and Twitter traffic. It has been increasing consistently for the last 2 years since 2014 elections. And we all know that he is not paying for that traffic. It is organic.
I personally do not know any other Indian politician who has shown this enormous amount of capacity. The only person who comes to mind was Subramanian Swamy when he was leading Janata Party. But at least the national media was covering him a lot for his sensational statements. JP does not even have that advantage.
Why is JP gaining strength? May be because people are realizing that he is the only person left in the entire Andhra Pradesh who can set right the sad situation.
Let's see how this will eventually turn out. Will this adoration translate to votes if JP decides to enter electoral politics again? People have failed him twice. Will they fail him again?

Sunday, March 20, 2016

Modi should invite JP to his Central Government team

The story started in 2013 when Narendra Modi began making the correct statements on building a successful India. The nation was furious about the corruption scandals in the Congress government. Jayaprakash Narayan, who prioritizes the nation above everything else, believed that Modi is the best PM that India can have in the current situation, and endorsed the PM candidature of Modi. In 2014 General elections, as JP contested from Malkajgiri, an important campaign slogan was "Modi for India, JP for Malkajgiri". People accepted the slogan even though Modi belonged to Bharatiya Janata Party and JP belonged to Lok Satta Party. Due to certain reasons, JP could not win that election.
Now, the biggest drawback of Modi's Government is the shortage of talented and driven ministers in the Central Government. Many ambitious plans are not getting executed because of this reason, resulting in low performance of India. Modi should immediately invite talented people to his team, else India will not perform to its full potential. JP is one of the apt persons that Modi should approach. I am sure that JP will accept to work with Modi, in an apolitical manner, keeping the best interests of the country in mind.
Previously, JP helped the former PM Manmohan Singh and Congress Chief Sonia Gandhi when Congress was in power. Even though JP was extremely critical of Congress Government (example: JP filed the 2G spectrum scam case against Congress Government Supreme Court), JP was always available to help the then PM Manmohan Singh and also Sonia Gandhi on policy related issues.
Now, Modi should realize the shortcomings of his Government and invite capable persons such as JP to take up responsibilities. If Modi does not act fast on these shortcomings, then he will face a very tough time in the next General Elections in 2019.

Saturday, January 16, 2016

Urban local elections is the future of LSP

Winning seats in city corporations is the most effective way for Lok Satta Party to grow. The party has gained acceptance in educated urban areas in certain cities in South India. The party can translate this into electoral victories if it focuses on certain specific divisions / wards in these cities where the party enjoys the demographic advantage. That is the reason it is important for LSP to fight hard in city corporations such as GHMC, BBMP, etc.
It is not easy for a party like LSP to win an MP or MLA seat in an urban area without first tasting success at the level of city corporations. Why?
1) An MP or MLA campaign requires significantly higher resources to create a 'wave' in that constituency towards victory. Even highly reputed contestants end up biting the dust
2) Sizable section of people tend to vote during General elections for a national party that they want to see in power at the center, even though they 'like' the LSP candidate who is contesting as an MP candidate.
For example, a large section of LSP sympathisers voted for BJP in the 2014 elections because they wanted Modi to become PM, even though they hated the local MP candidate of BJP (or a local party in alliance with BJP). This holds true for a typical State election too.
3) With a great campaign, an election at the division/ward level is winnable, as it is far easier to inspire your target voters to vote for you on pure 'performance' plank.
That said, the major challenge for LSP is that a typical LSP supporter does not vote at all in the city corporation / municipal elections! Hence, the mobilization and inspiring skills of the local candidate to get her educated voters (who are notorious for not exercising their vote) to the voting booth becomes most important.
Hence, LSP fighting the oncoming GHMC elections in February 2016 with enthusiasm is a very important story of the endeavor for clean politics.

Saturday, January 2, 2016

Where is Aam Aadmi Party in 2016 GHMC elections? Why are they shying away?

We all know how Aam Aadmi Party acted irresponsibly with Lok Satta Party between 2013 to 2014. Even though Lok Satta Party supported AAP in 2013 Delhi Assembly elections and stopped itself from placing candidates against AAP candidates, AAP decided to fight against LSP in 2014 General Elections and 2014 united Andhra Pradesh Assembly elections. Ungrateful, small-minded folks!
If AAP was serious about bringing out a corruption-free politics, then why did it go all out to attempt to defeat LSP? AAP fielded candidates against Jayaprakash Narayan in Malkajgiri MP constituency, and against me in Malkajgiri MLA constituency. But AAP failed miserably to damage LSP.
Now, where is AAP in Hyderabad? What is it doing for 2016 GHMC elections? AAP tried to do negative politics in 2014 elections in Hyderabad -- against JP, against me. Now, where is it?
AAP members in Hyderabad should honestly ask themselves -- was such negative politics in 2014 against JP and myself worth it? It is time they grow up.

Friday, January 1, 2016

LSP, CPI and CPM are in alliance for GHMC elections 2016

Today, LSP, CPI and CPM have announced a local-issue based alliance for GHMC elections that are slated to be held this month. The broader agenda is clean politics and the alliance is rightly called 'Alliance for Clean Politics' (ACP). It is still the early days and the modalities of seat-sharing will be announced soon.

My comments:
  1. I welcome this alliance but only for specific local body elections such as GHMC elections.
  2. Alliance in the name of clean politics is a good idea, because the Left parties and LSP have nothing else in common!
  3. It is good that the discourse is on clean politics especially when GHMC is corruption-ridden. Other parties have no proper agenda except for inciting regional feelings.
  4. This alliance between LSP and the Left parties can become a blue-print for other local body elections that will be held in other metropolitan areas in certain states of India where LSP has a presence.
  5. Demographically this alliance makes sense -- educated voters typically favor LSP, while low-wage workers typically favor the Left parties. That said, we need to check how effective the vote-transfer between these parties will be.
  6. This kind of alliance might not work for Assembly or General elections because the ideologies of LSP and the Left parties are very different. Also, the Left parties have a tendency to align with Congress during General elections whereas it is unlikely that LSP is going to align with the Congress.

At this stage, the developments are not earth-shattering. Let's observe how the situation evolves from here.

Friday, October 2, 2015

Launching QuietGrowth

Hello all! I am happy to announce that I am launching QuietGrowth (QuietGrowth.com.au), the most advanced automated investment service in Australia.
It has been a lot of work by many talented and motivated team members over the last 1 year in Sydney, Bangalore and few other places, to make this happen.
The sphere of personal investment service is broken. Few initiatives are being taken to correct the wrongs in countries such as the U.S., U.K., and Australia. QuietGrowth is one of those initiatives.
Wish us success. Your support is valuable. If you have any friends living in Australia, please refer our service to them. You can also help us by 
1) Liking our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/QuietGrowth
2) Following our Twitter page: https://twitter.com/quietgrowth
Have a good day!

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Name and shame the anti-India scoundrels

Below is the list of pathetic living beings who have written a letter to work against the Republic of India and the democratically elected Indian Prime Minister of India on the eve of the visit to the silicon valley by the Prime Minister.
Instead of just refuting the content in their letter (which many have done in detail), I am going one step ahead to name each one of these anti-India agents and shame them.
Enjoy your pathetic lives, my dear pathetic creatures! Find your name below and enjoy!
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Meena Alexander, Distinguished Professor of English, Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York
Arjun Appadurai, Paulette Goddard Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication, New York University
Anjali Arondekar, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies, UC Santa Cruz
Fredrick Asher, Professor of Art History and South Asian Studies, University of Minnesota
Paola Bacchetta, Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies University of California, Berkeley
Sarada Balagopalan, Associate Professor of Childhood Studies, Rutgers University, Camden
Radhika Balakrishnan, Prof of Women’s and Gender Studies, Rutgers University
Shahzad Bashir, Professor of Religious Studies, Stanford University
Manu Bhagavan, Professor of History and Human Rights, Hunter College and the Graduate Center, The City University of New York
Mona Bhan Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology
DePauw University
Srimati Basu, Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies, University of Kentucky
Prashant Bharadwaj, Associate Professor of Economics, University of California, San Diego
Nilanjana Bhattacharjya, Faculty Fellow, Barrett Honors College, Arizona State University
Nandini Bhattacharya, Professor of English, Texas A &M University, College-Station
Tithi Bhattacharya, Associate Professor of South Asian History, Purdue University
Amit R. Baishya, Assistant Professor of English, University of Oklahoma
Akeel Bilgrami, Sidney Morgenbesser Professor of Philosophy and Director, South Asian Institute, Columbia University
Purnima Bose, Associate Professor, English and International Studies, Indiana University-Bloomington
Christopher Candland, Associate Professor of Political Science, Wellesley College
Paula Chakravartty, Associate Professor, Gallatin School, & Department of Media, Culture and Communication, New York University
Shefali Chandra, Associate Professor of South Asian History Washington University, St. Louis
S. Charusheela, Associate Professor, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, University of Washington, Bothell
Partha Chatterjee, Professor of Anthropology and South Asian Studies, Columbia University
Indrani Chatterjee Professor of History and South Asian Studies, University of Texas, Austin
Swati Chattopadhyay Professor History of Art and Architecture, University of California, Santa Barbara
Marty Chen, Lecturer, School of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School and Affiliated Professor, Harvard Graduate School of Design
Rohit Chopra, Associate Professor of Communication, Santa Clara University
Elora Chowdhury Associate Professor & Chair, Women’s and Gender Studies, University of Massachusetts, Boston
E. Valentine Daniel, Professor of Anthropology, Colombia University
Monisha Das Gupta, Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and Women’s Studies, University of Hawaii, Manoa
Jigna Desai, Professor of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies, University of Minnesota
Pawan Dhingra, Professor of Sociology, Tufts University
Wendy Doniger, Professor of the History of Religions, University of Chicago
Richard Falk, Professor of International Law Emeritus, Princeton University
Bishnupriya Ghosh, Professor of English University of California, Santa Barbara
Huma Ahmed-Ghosh, Professor and Chair of Women’s Studies, San Diego State University
Durba Ghosh, Associate Professor of History, Cornell University
Sumanth Gopinath, Associate Professor of Music Theory, School of Music, University of Minnesota
Nitin Govil, Associate Professor of Cinema & Media Studies, University of Southern California
Paul Greenough, Professor of History and Community and Behavioral Health and Director, South Asian Studies Program, University of Iowa
Inderpal Grewal, Professor of South Asian Studies, Yale University
Sumit Guha, Frances Higginbotham Nalle Centennial Professor of History, University of Texas, Austin
Thomas Blom Hansen, Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Center for South Asia, Stanford University
Syed Akbar Hyder, Associate Professor of South Asian Studies, University of Texas, Austin
Nalini Iyer, Professor of English, Seattle University
Priya Jaikumar, Associate Professor of Cinema and Media Studies, University of Southern California
Pranav Jani, Associate Professor of English, Ohio State University
Sheila Jasanoff, Professor of Science and Technology Studies, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government
Arun W. Jones, Associate Professor, Candler School of Theology, Emory University
May Joseph, Professor of Social Science, Pratt Institute
Priya Joshi, Associate Professor of English and Associate Director, Center for the Humanities, Temple University
Sampath Kannan, Henry Salvatore Professor of Computer and Information Science, University of Pennsylvania
Suvir Kaul, A.M. Rosenthal Professor of English, University of Pennsylvania
Waqas Khwaja, Professor of English, Agnes Scott College
Naveeda Khan, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Johns Hopkins University
Nyla Ali Khan, Visiting Professor of Women’s Studies, University of Oklahoma, Norman
Satish Kolluri, Associate Professor of Communications, Pace University
Ruby Lal, Professor of Middle East and South Asian Studies, Emory University
Sarah Lamb, Professor of Anthropology and Head of the Division of Social Sciences, Brandeis University; Co-Chair of South Asian Studies
Karen Leonard, Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus, University of California, Irvine
David Lelyveld, Professor of History, Emeritus, William Paterson University
Jinee Lokaneeta, Associate Professor of Political Science and International Relations, Drew University
Ania Loomba, Catherine Bryson Professor of English, University of Pennsylvania
David Ludden, Professor of History, New York University
Ritty Lukose, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and South Asian Studies, the Gallatin School, New York University
Sudhir Mahadevan Assistant Professor of Film Studies, Comparative Literature, Cinema and Media, University of Washington, Seattle
Tayyab Mahmud, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Global Justice Seattle University School of Law
Sunaina Maira, Professor of Asian American Studies, University of California, Davis
Neepa Majumdar, Associate Professor of English, University of Pittsburgh
Bakirathi Mani, Associate Professor of English Literature, Swarthmore College
Rebecca J. Manring, Associate Professor of India Studies and Religious Studies Indiana University-Bloomington
Monika Mehta, Associate Professor, Department of English, Binghamton University
Jisha Menon, Assistant Professor of Theatre and Performance Studies, Stanford University
Kalyani Devaki Menon, Associate Professor of Religious Studies, DePaul University
Sally Engle Merry, Silver Professor of Anthropology, New York University
Raza Mir, Professor of Management, Cotsakos College of Business, William Paterson University
Deepti Misri, Associate Professor of Women and Gender Studies University of Colorado, Boulder
Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Chair and Distinguished Professor of Women’s & Gender Studies, and Dean’s Professor of Humanities, Syracuse University
Satya P. Mohanty, Professor of English, Cornell University
Megan Moodie, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz
Projit B. Mukharji, Martin Meyerson Assistant Professor in Interdisciplinary Studies, History & Sociology of Science, University of Pennsylvania
Madhavi Murty, Assistant Professor of Feminist Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz
Vijaya Nagarajan, Associate Professor of Theology & Religious Studies, Program in Environmental Studies, University of San Francisco
Martha C. Nussbaum, Professor of Law and Philosophy, University of Chicago
Gyanendra Pandey, Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor of History, Emory University
Carla Petievich, Visiting Professor of South Asian Studies, University of Texas, Austin
Sheldon Pollock, Professor of South Asian Studies, Columbia University
Kavita Philip, Associate Professor of History, University of California, Irvine
Vijay Prashad, George and Martha Kellner Chair of South Asian History, Trinity College
Jasbir K. Puar, Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies, Rutgers University
Balakrishnan Rajagopal, Professor of Law and Development, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
R.Radhakrishnan, Chancellor’s Professor of English and Comparative Literature, University of California, Irvine
Gloria Raheja, Professor of Anthropology, University of Minnesota
Junaid Rana, Associate Professor of Asian American Studies, University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana
Anupama Rao, Professor of Anthropology, Barnard College
Velcheru Narayana Rao, Distinguished Visiting Professor of Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies, Emory University
Kasturi Ray, Associate Professor of Women and Gender Studies/Co-Director, South Asian Studies, San Francisco State University
M.V. Ramana, Program on Science and Global Security, Princeton University
Sumathi Ramaswamy, Professor of History, Duke University
Chandan Reddy, Associate Professor of English, University of Washington, Seattle
Gayatri Reddy, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies, University of Illinois, Chicago
Modhumita Roy, Associate Professor of English, Tufts University
Parama Roy, Professor of English, University of California, Davis
Sharmila Rudrappa, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Texas at Austin
G.S. Sahota, Assistant Professor of Literature, University of California, Santa Cruz
Yasmin Saikia, Hardt-Nickachos Chair in Peace Studies & Professor of History, Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict, Arizona State University
Arun Saldanha, Associate Professor of Geography, Environment and Society University of Minnesota
Juned Shaikh, Assistant Professor of History, University of California, Santa Cruz
Nitasha Tamar Sharma, Charles Deering McCormick Professor of Teaching Excellence and Associate Professor of African American Studies and Asian American Studies, Northwestern University
Elora Shehabuddin, Associate Professor of Humanities and Political Science, Rice University
Bhaskar Sarkar, Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara
Priya Satia, Associate Professor of History, Stanford University
Aradhana Sharma, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Wesleyan University
Snehal Shinghavi, Associate Professor of English and South Asian Studies, University of Texas, Austin
Ajay Skaria, Professor of History, University of Minnesota
Shalini Shankar, Chair and Associate Professor of Asian American Studies, Northwestern University
S. Shankar, Professor of English,University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Amritjit Singh, Langston Hughes Professor of English, Ohio University
Mytheli Sreenivas, Associate Professor of History and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Ohio State University
Rajini Srikanth, Professor, English, University of Massachusetts Boston
Nidhi Srinivas, Associate Professor of Nonprofit Management, The New School
Ajantha Subramanian, Professor of Anthropology and South Asian Studies, Harvard University
Banu Subramaniam, Professor, Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Kaushik Sunder Rajan, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Chicago
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, University Professor in the Humanities,
Columbia University
Raja Swamy, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Tennessee
Tariq Thachil, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Yale University
Ashwini Tambe, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies, University of Maryland, College-Park
Vamsi Vakulabharanam, Associate Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Jyotsna Vaid, Professor of Psychology, Texas A&M University
Siva Vaidhyanathan Robertson Professor of Media Studies, University of Virginia
Sylvia Vatuk, Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus, University of Illinois, Chicago
Gauri Viswanathan, Class of 1933 Professor in the Humanities and
Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University
Kamala Visweswaran, Professor of Ethnic Studies, University of California, San Diego
Kalindi Vora, Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies, University of California, San Diego
Bonnie Zare, Professor of Gender & Women’s Studies, University of Wyoming
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